PROSCI CERTIFICATION

Contact us

Feel free to call us at 70 23 22 40, or fill out the form below

Read the Personal Data Policy here

Call Us 70232240

The recipe for a compelling story
– Rich and light versions

By: Anna Balk-Møller, Principal Consultant

A compelling story is a simple dish. The beauty of it is the potential of using it as a base for a multitude of servings. But as simplicity is the ultimate sophistication, the process of preparation is less simple.

As you are looking at a recipe for the compelling story, I assume you already know what it is and why it is necessary. Briefly explained, it is a well written piece of paper that contains a combination of words and sentences so well chosen that the 2-4 key messages prevail and leave a lasting impression. It is seldom used directly in the original format but will be ‘Ctrl C + Crtl V-ed’ again and again to re-use different bits where most relevant. For more information you can read this article in Danish.

Below you will find a recipe for both a rich and a light version. If you do not have the time available for cooking the rich version, you can skip to the light recipe and read from there. If you do have the time available, you can simply read the first recipe and skip the rest.

But one question must be answered before you get started: Who should the compelling story be served to? It can be a story about your company to be used for various presentation purposes. But in my experience, it adds tremendous value to prepare it for a large project or a strategy implementation to be served for various stakeholders.

So, before you can start on the recipes below you need to the have one key ingredient prepared. It can be an analysis of your company (your value proposition, your culture, your values and your market position), a project charter or a strategy document. In the following, I will assume that you have already prepared this component. And therefore, you are now ready to ensure, that your various stakeholders will have identical knowledge about the company/project/strategy which leaves them with a far more powerful impression and a clearer recollection. And which leaves you with increased control over your key messages.

Recipe for the rich version

Ready in: 3-5 weeks

Ingredients:

  • 1 analysis/project charter/strategy document
  • 1 cup of ’what’
  • 3 tablespoons of ‘why’
  • A fair amount of WIIFM
  • 1-5 management senders of communication
  • 1-2 communication specialists
  • A dash of ‘Tone of Voice’
  • 1 facilitator (optional)

Directions:

  1. Start by preparing the backbone of the story. Gather all management in one room for at least 2 hours. This step is done when you have selected 2-4 key messages from the strategy, have decided on a structure for the compelling story and have formulated clear headlines (workshop 1). Tip: Include discussions about Tone of Voice to season the backbone with the taste and flavour you prefer.
  2. Consolidate the input. Stir regularly.
  3. Start on the co-creation process of composing the story with management. Add bits and pieces from the strategy but remember to balance the flow with the right examples from the receiver perspective. This can easily take 2-3 hours (workshop 2). Tip: You might want to add 1 facilitator to ask critical questions on behalf of the receivers.
  4. (Repeat step three until the entire draft is done and all relevant stakeholders are on board).
  5. Edit the text, review and obtain approval by management. Taste to see if you might need to regulate the Tone of Voice flavour.
  6. As the compelling story is mainly the base ingredient for further communication it is now ready to be transformed into the desired formats (articles, PowerPoint presentation, etc.).
  7. Practice, practice, practice before serving.

Serving tip:

Season the serving with the underappreciated ingredient ‘space’. Often, people have a fixed idea about the number of slides to use when serving. That number is irrelevant! Too much information served on a single plate is unappetising and damaging to your guests’ appetite (as well as their concentration and recollection).

Recipe for the light version

Ready in: 2 weeks

Ingredients:

  • 1 analysis/project charter/strategy document
  • 1 cup of ’what’
  • 3 tablespoons of ‘why’
  • A fair amount of WIIFM
  • 1-2 management senders of communication
  • 1 communication specialist

Directions:

  1. Start by preparing a draft of the backbone of the story. Select 2-4 key messages from the strategy and propose a structure. Add relevant passages from the strategy to each key message and complement with proposed headlines.
  2. Season the draft with input from all relevant stakeholders.
  3. Co-create the story with management. Gather relevant management in a room and ensure that they focus on text editing (workshop 1). If you do not finish all sections in the draft in the time available, be sure to agree on a finalisation process.
  4. Add 1 communication specialist to edit the text. Review and approval should be done by management to ensure buy-in.
  5. As the compelling story is mainly the base ingredient for further communication it is now ready to be transformed into the desired format you need for the immediate event (other formats can be prepared later).
  6. Practice as much as possible before serving.

Serving tip:

Season the serving with the underappreciated ingredient ‘space’. Often, people have a fixed idea about the number of slides to use when serving. That number is irrelevant! Too much information served on a single plate is unappetising and damaging to both your guests’ appetite (as well as their concentration and recollection).

We are serving tomorrow – is there a ‘bake-off’ version we can use?

Unfortunately, not. But if you have already prepared tomorrows serving, you should spend the remaining time ensuring that the key messages are clear. If people only remember three things from the presentation, have you made those perfectly clear?

Yes

  • Spend the remaining time perfecting the wording of the headlines of these.
  • Make them stand out in the presentation and repeat them.
  • Practice!

NO

  • Prepare clear key messages (formulated from an employee or customer perspective).
  • Perfect the headlines, so they are strong and relatable.
  • Practice!

  • “Very good! Fun! Interactive and challenging”

    Anna-Karin Ahlflood, Ericsson

  • “Excellent! I have learned so much”

    Elin Dahlkvist – Systembolaget

  • “Exceptional”

    Johan Ölën – Volvo Group

  • “Very good – Everything was there!”

    Pierre Lavorini – Volvo Group

  • “The best course I have attended to!”

    Lars Herbe – Kvadrat

  • “Very inspiring and informative”

    Margit Weygaard-Hansen – Aller Media A/S

  • “Plug & Play”

    Gitte Nørgaard – Københavns Lufthavne A/S

  • “Combining learning, food and service at very high level. Best course ever!”

    Danni Rahbek – Bestseller A/S

  • “Extremely professional carried out”

    Anitha Rutström Sparrman – Ericsson

  • “Intense and very rewarding”

    Per Larsson – EON

  • “Very good course! I want to take it again”

    Marianne Steen – Enatus Consulting AB

  • “It was an excellent, excellent course!!”

    Jakob Larsen – Novo Nordisk A/S

Info

proacteur aps
Lottenborgvej 24B,
2800 Kgs. Lyngby

+45 7023 2240
info@proacteur.com

CVR/VAT: DK29198012

Find us

×

Ring op

Skriv til os

Prosci kursus

Menu